Suscríbase a la newsletter de Galería Circular y esté al tanto de todas nuestras exposiciones, novedades y promociones exclusivas para nuestros suscriptores.

Suscríbase a la newsletter de Galería Circular y esté al tanto de todas nuestras exposiciones, novedades y promociones exclusivas para nuestros suscriptores.
 

List of artworks by Joan Miró

Showing 1 - 5 of 5 items

Barcelona, 1893-Palm of Majorca, Spain, 1983) Painter, sculptor, engraver and Spanish potter. He studied trade and worked for two years as shop assistant in a cleaning supplies shop, until an illness obliged him to retiring during a long period in a familiar home in the small people of Mont-roig of the Camp.

Of return to Barcelona, he entered the Art Academy managed by Francisco Galí, in which he knew the last European artistic trends. Up to 1919, its paint was dominated by a formal expressionism with Fauvist and cubist influences, centered in the landscapes, portraits and nudes.

That same year he traveled to Paris and knew Picasso, Jacob and some members of the dadaist current, as Tristan Tzara. It alternated new stays in the French capital with summers in Mont-roig and its paint started to evolve towards a bigger definition of the form, now chiselled by a strong light that eliminates the contrasts. In what is thematic they stand out the first slight signs of a language between oneiric and phantasmagoric, very personal although of popular roots, which all its subsequent trajectory would mark.

...

Barcelona, 1893-Palm of Majorca, Spain, 1983) Painter, sculptor, engraver and Spanish potter. He studied trade and worked for two years as shop assistant in a cleaning supplies shop, until an illness obliged him to retiring during a long period in a familiar home in the small people of Mont-roig of the Camp.


Of return to Barcelona, he entered the Art Academy managed by Francisco Galí, in which he knew the last European artistic trends. Up to 1919, its paint was dominated by a formal expressionism with Fauvist and cubist influences, centered in the landscapes, portraits and nudes.


That same year he traveled to Paris and knew Picasso, Jacob and some members of the dadaist current, as Tristan Tzara. It alternated new stays in the French capital with summers in Mont-roig and its paint started to evolve towards a bigger definition of the form, now chiselled by a strong light that eliminates the contrasts. In what is thematic they stand out the first slight signs of a language between oneiric and phantasmagoric, very personal although of popular roots, which all its subsequent trajectory would mark.


Similar to the principles of the Surrealism, signed the Manifesto (1924) and incorporated in its work concerns characteristic of this movement, as the hieroglyph and the calligraphic sign (The carnival of the harlequin). The other great influence of the period would come of the hand of P. Klee, of which it would comprise the taste by the linear configuration and the recreation of ethereal atmospheres and fields changed slightly chromatic.


In 1928, the Modern Art Museum of New York acquired two of its fabrics, which meant a first international recognition of its work; a year afterwards, he got married with Pilar Juncosa. During these years the artist was questioned the sense of the paint, conflict that reflects clearly in its work. On the one hand, he initiated the series of Dutch Interiors, multicolored recreations of paints of the 17th century characterized by a partial return to the imagination and a marked trend towards the preciousness, which would keep in its coloristic, playful and poetic dummies for Romeo and Julieta de los Ballets Rusos de Diaghilev (1929). Its posterior paint, however, runs away towards a bigger aridity, schematism and conceptual abstraction. On the other hand, in its sculptural works he opted for the use of recycled material and of desecho.


The Spanish civil war did not do but to highlight this dichotomy between violent tear (Woman Head) and dreamy evasion (Constellations), that little by little kept being solved in favor of a renewed serenity, cheered up by a return to the naivety of the traditional mironiana symbology (the bird, the stars, the feminine figure) that it seems to a naive vision to reflect in turn the return, happy and violent of the world. The island of Majorca, where in 1956 it built a study, in the locality of Sound Abrines, did not find its occasional retirements foreign to this sort of spiritual renewal.


Meanwhile, Miró extended the horizon of its work with the engravings of the Barcelona series (1944) and, a year afterwards, with its first works in ceramics, carried out in collaboration with Llorens Artigas. In the decades of 1950 and 1960 he carried out several murals of great size for locations as different as the headquarters of the Unesco in Paris, the University of Harvard or the airport of Barcelona; from that moment and even the end of its race it would alternate the public work of great size (It donates i ocell, sculpture), with the intimism of its bronzes, collages and tapestries. In 1975 the Foundation Miró, whose building its great friend Josep Lluís Sert designed, was inaugurated in Barcelona


 


BIOGRAPHIES TEXT OF WEB AND LIVES


1954 Great Prize of Engraving of the Biennial of Venice


1959 Big Cross of the Civil Order to Alfonso X the Wise


1959 Great Prize of the Foundation Guggenheim.


1962 Nombrado Chevalier of the Honor Legion in France.


1966 Prize Carnegie of paint.


1968 Nombrado honoris causa doctor through the University of Harvard.


1978 received the Gold Medal of the Generality of Catalonia, being the first Catalan in receiving such a distinction.


1979 Nombrado honoris causa doctor through the University of Barcelona.


1980 received the Gold Medal of the Fine Arts, of hands of the king Juan Carlos I of Spain.


1983 Nombrado honoris causa doctor through the University of Murcia.

More
Showing 1 - 5 of 5 items